Wedding Dress Silhouettes

Before a Bride even steps foot in a store, she should sit down with a pen and a pad of paper for a brainstorming session. She should consider what cut of dress she usually wears; whether or not she wants her Wedding Dress to concur with her usual style or make a different statement.For this she should take some time to close her eyes and envision herself in her future dress.

Nine months before the Wedding, or even before that, the Bride should start her shopping. Important things to bring include that pen and paper, a strapless bra and shoes that have heels about the same height as she wants for her Wedding. Mothers, Bridesmaids, close relatives and good friends can make valuable shopping companions, but remember the old adage: too many cooks spoil the broth. A few extra sets of eyes can be helpful, but too many opinions can confuse and overwhelm.

During the entire Wedding Dress process-from shopping through fitting to picking it up-a Bride should never be afraid to ask questions. Everything she is unsure about, or anything she wants confirmed, she should ask. It is particularly important to discuss comfort, especially during fittings; a Bride may only wear her Wedding Dress for one day, but it can be a long day, and her happy memories should not be tainted by any garment slipping off or digging in where it shouldn't. Let's discuss a little about some famous Wedding Dress Silhouettes:

1. The Ball Gown Silhouette features a fitted bodice and a full skirt that puffs out from the waistline. It can flatter any figure, accentuating the bust, slimming the waist and augmenting the hips. Examples of ball gown dresses in popular media include Disney's Cinderella in her blue dress and Belle in her yellow gown.

2. The Princess Silhouette is the most popular for Wedding Dresses today. It hugs the natural curves of the upper body, and the skirt flares out, resembling the letter A (with the peak at the waistline). This flattering and versatile silhouette can have a skirt as slim or as full as a Bride would like.

3. The Empire Silhouette begins its waistline just below the bust. This cut can drape gently down, or flow beautifully around the Bride as she walks and dances.

4. The form-fitting Sheath Silhouette can balance elegance and allure like no other kind of dress. It hugs all the natural curves to the hips. A good example of a Sheath Silhouette can be found on Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's.

5. Finally, the sophisticated Mermaid Silhouette clings to a Bride's natural curves all the way down to her thighs or knees, and then flares out into a full skirt. It gives the Bride the benefit of both a dazzling shape and a flowing skirt.

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